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Gloucester Docks &
the Sharpness Canal

 

Gloucester Waterways Museum Boats


For more Museum Boats, see Dredger & Sabrina 5, Tug Progress and Progress at Work

NWM dredger and tugsThis page gives some basic information about each of the historic craft on view at the Gloucester Waterways Museum, and links lead to other pages giving more details and pictures.

Steam Dredger SND No 4
     
SND No 4 was built in Holland in 1925 and was used on the Gloucester & Sharpness Canal and docks until 1981. When dredging, the bucket ladder was lowered to the required depth, and the buckets tipped the mud into a hopper barge moored alongside. It is maintained as a working exhibit by the Friends of the Museum. (More)

Tug Severn Progress
     Severn Progress was built in 1931 by Charles Hill & Sons of Bristol for the Severn & Canal Carrying Company based in Gloucester. She was mainly used for towing barges and canal boats on the River Severn between Gloucester, Worcester and Stourport until this commercial traffic died out in the late 1960s. After several years helping with maintenance work on the Kennet & Avon Canal, Progress is now looked after by the Friends of the Museum, who use her for tug handling courses and occasional towing jobs. (More)     Top

Barge Sabrina 5
     Sabrina 5 was one of six unpowered barges built in 1944 by Charles Hill & Sons of Bristol for the Ministry of War Transport. They were mainly used for carrying 130 to 150 tons of imports from Avonmouth to Worcester or Stourport via the Gloucester & Sharpness Canal and the River Severn. The barge fleet was formally disbanded in 1969, and after several years of idleness, Sabrina 5 was restored to join the Museum's collection in 1988. (More)     Top

Narrow Boat Northwich
     Northwich was built at Saltley, Birmingham, in 1898 for the well-known carriers Fellows Morton & Clayton. Originally pulled by a horse and later towed by a motor boat, Northwich was mainly used for carrying a wide range of general cargoes on the canals between London and Birmingham. After the nationalised carrying fleet was disbanded in 1964, Northwich spent many years at Stoke Bruerne, first in the weighing machine and then as a floating exhibit, and eventually came to Gloucester in time for the opening of the Museum in 1988.  Top

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